Posts for: August, 2014

By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
August 29, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   xylitol  
Dental-FriendlyChewingGumcanbeBeneficialtoYourOralHealth

Chewing gum, so much a part of modern culture, actually has ancient roots — humans have been chewing some form of it for thousands of years. While gum chewing is a benign habit for the most part, it does raise some dental health concerns.

The good news for jaw function is that chewing gum is unlikely to cause any long-term problems for your joints if you respond to your body’s warning signals. Our joints, muscles and associated nerves have a built-in mechanism of fatigue and pain signaling to help us avoid overuse. Furthermore, the action of chewing stimulates the production and release of saliva. Among saliva’s many beneficial properties is its ability to neutralize acid, which can soften and erode tooth enamel. It also strengthens enamel by restoring some of the calcium and other minerals lost from acid.

That doesn’t mean, however, that the physical act of chewing gum isn’t without risks. Chewing gum “exercises” your jaw muscles and makes them stronger, so they’re able to deliver more force to your teeth. This could lead to future tooth mobility and excessive wear. It’s important then that you don’t chew gum excessively to avoid this kind of damage to your teeth.

Unfortunately, there’s more bad news involving a key ingredient in many brands. Many manufacturers use sugar (sucrose) to sweeten their product, which is a major part of its appeal. Sugar, however, is a prime food source for oral bacteria responsible for tooth decay. The prolonged presence of sugar in the mouth when we chew gum can negate the beneficial effects of increased saliva.

A sweetener called xylitol, though, could be the answer to “having your gum and chewing it too.” This alcohol-based sugar (which, by the way, has almost half the calories of table sugar) has the opposite effect on bacteria — rather than becoming a food source it actually inhibits bacterial growth. Studies have even shown that products like chewing gum, mints or candy sweetened with xylitol can contribute significantly to a reduction in dental caries (cavities) caused by decay.

The better news: you don’t have to give up chewing gum for the sake of your teeth — just be sure to choose products with dental-friendly ingredients and don’t chew excessively. You’ll not only reduce the risks of tooth decay and damage, you’ll also promote a healthier environment in your mouth.

If you would like more information on chewing gum and its effects on dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Chewing Gum” and “Xylitol in Chewing Gum.”


By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
August 20, 2014
Category: Oral Health
ConsciousSedationcanMakeYourChildsDentalVisitMorePleasant

Anxiety in a child during dental procedures could interfere with the care they need. But recent advances in sedation drug therapy can calm pediatric patients safely and allow us to perform more invasive procedures without general anesthesia.

In contrast to general anesthesia, conscious sedation allows a patient to relax and feel calm while still breathing normally on their own and able to respond to certain stimuli. Conscious sedation can be deep, moderate or minimal. Deep sedation is akin to sleep and will also cause the child not to remember details of the procedure when they awaken. At the other end of the spectrum is minimal sedation, the most common type used in pediatric dentistry, which allows patients to respond to touching or verbal commands. Deep sedation drugs are usually administered intravenously, while those used for minimal sedation are administered orally with syrup. Conscious sedation doesn’t prevent pain, so it must also be accompanied by local anesthesia or other pain-relieving methods.

After you arrive for your child’s procedure, we’ll normally conduct a pre-sedation evaluation to be sure there are no medical problems that might interfere with the sedation. We typically use Midazolam (under the brand name Versed) or Hydroxyzine (also known as Vistaril or Atarax) to achieve sedation. Both are very safe, fast-acting and exit the body quickly after treatment.

During the procedure, a designated member of our staff continuously monitors your child’s vital signs, including pulse and respiration rates, blood pressure, temperature, and blood oxygen level. After the procedure your child will remain in recovery until vital signs return to pre-sedation levels. You should then take your child home and monitor them for the remainder of the day — definitely no return to school until at least the next day.

Safety is a top priority when using any sedation therapy — dental professionals follow strict procedures and protocols, as well as adhere to certification requirements enforced by many states. Performed in this manner, conscious sedation can help ensure your child’s experiences in our office are pleasant, and will hopefully result in a greater willingness when they grow up to continue professional dental care.

If you would like more information on conscious sedation for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sedation Dentistry for Kids.”


By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
August 15, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
BracesAreNoHurdleforOlympicTrackStar

Lashinda Demus holds the U.S record in the 400 meter hurdles, with a time of 52.47 seconds, the third fastest ever recorded. While her twin 5-year-old boys cheered her on, she brought home a silver medal from the 2012 London Olympics. But when it comes to her full set of upper and lower braces, there's no silver to be seen!

Demus is a top-ranked competitor, a wife and a mom — and an adult who is currently in orthodontic treatment. With her orthodontist's approval, she chose clear ceramic braces. These are just one of the treatment options available to adult patients, many of whom prefer a less noticeable style of orthodontic appliance.

As many as three-quarters of adults are thought to have some form of orthodontic problem. Common issues include teeth that are crowded too closely together, or ones that have drifted too far apart after an extraction or other tooth loss. It is believed that straightened teeth are easier to clean and better for chewing — they can also improve an adult's social life, and even his or her career prospects!

Some grown-ups may hesitate to consider orthodontic treatment because they remember the “railroad tracks” they saw in junior high school. In fact, there have been many changes in orthodontic appliances in the past few years. Two popular choices for adults are colorless braces (the kind Demus wears) and clear orthodontic aligners.

Colorless ceramic braces are made of high-tech composite materials. They resist staining, and are less noticeable because their translucent appearance blends with the teeth. Often, a single wire is the only part that's plainly visible. Sometimes it's even possible to place them on the lingual (tongue) side of the teeth.

Clear aligners are an alternative to braces that are available to adults and teens. Instead of wires and attachments, these consist of a series of transparent, removable trays that are placed over the teeth and worn 20 hours per day. Over a period of six months to two years, the teeth are gradually straightened as you progress from one computer-designed tray to the next. Best of all, you can remove the trays completely to clean your teeth, and for important occasions.

Which one is right for you? It depends. While aligners have been successful in treating mild to moderate spacing issues, more difficult problems with the bite may require a more traditional form of braces. Also, there are a few health problems which might need to be attended to before orthodontic treatment is begun. The best way to learn about your options is to come in for a consultation. But remember: if you want a better smile, it's never too late.

If you would like more information about orthodontic choices, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Orthodontics For The Older Adult” and “Clear Orthodontic Aligners.”


By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
August 04, 2014
Category: Oral Health
AntibacterialSolutionscanHelpFightAdvancedGumDiseaseInfections

Periodontal (gum) disease is an infectious disease that progressively weakens the attachment of supporting tissues to the teeth, including gums, ligaments and bone. If not stopped, the loss of attachment will eventually lead to bone and tooth loss.

A thin layer of plaque that builds up on teeth (mainly due to poor oral hygiene habits) is the main breeding ground for the bacteria that cause gum disease. Our main treatment goal is to remove as much of this plaque as possible from tooth and gum surfaces. Much of the plaque can be removed using special hand or ultrasonic instruments that deep clean dental surfaces, including the roots. But while effective, these manual techniques may not address the full extent of infection, especially if the disease is well advanced.

If severe bone loss has already occurred, deep pockets of infection may have developed. As bone loss progresses, teeth with multiple roots may also develop an anatomical problem known as furcation invasions where the roots of the tooth branch off. If there continues to be signs of disease, like gum inflammation, bleeding or pus formation, it’s these hard to reach areas that may still be a problem even after extensive treatment. If so, we may need to take a different approach with antimicrobial or antibiotic products.

The most effective antimicrobial substance for reducing bacteria in biofilm is a chlorhexidine mouthrinse. The typical 0.12% solution is only available by prescription — if taken for a prolonged time it can result in tooth staining, affected taste or mouth irritation. To assure the solution reaches below the gum line, it will need to be applied by us in the office, followed up flushing irrigation of the affected area.

Another alternative is topically applied antibiotics that can stop or even reverse the progression of gum disease. There’s evidence that topical applications can penetrate into these deeper areas of infection. A common antibiotic used in this way is tetracycline, which has been shown to stop inflammation and infection.

These treatments don’t eliminate the need for mechanical cleaning, and the prolonged use of antibacterial products can have a detrimental effect on “good” bacteria (needed, for example, to complete the digestive process). It will depend on the extent of the gum disease to determine how successful conservative treatment may be. It’s also important that you contribute to your own dental health with a renewed daily oral hygiene habit.

If you would like more information on treatments for gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treating Difficult Areas of Periodontal Disease.”


By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures  
DIYDentureRepair-DontTryThisatHome

At first glance, you might think at-home denture repair belongs in the same category as Do-It-Yourself brain surgery and cloning your pet in the kitchen sink. But the fact is, you can actually buy a variety of DIY denture repair kits on line, send for them through the mail, even pick them up at some drug stores;you can even watch a youtube video on how to do your own denture repair. So if you’re feeling like Mr. (or Ms.) Fix-it, should you give it a whirl?

Absolutely not! (Do we even have to say this?) Repairing dentures is strictly a job for professionals — and here’s why:

First off, dentures are custom-fabricated products that have to fit perfectly in order to work the way they should. They are subject to extreme biting forces, yet balance evenly on the alveolar ridges — the bony parts of the upper and lower jaw that formerly held the natural teeth. In order to ensure their quality, fit and durability, dentures are made by experienced technicians in a carefully controlled laboratory setting, and fitted by dentists who specialize in this field. So just ask yourself: What are the chances you’re going to get it right on your first try?

What’s more, the potential problems aren’t just that DIY-repaired dentures won’t feel as comfortable or work as well. Sharp edges or protruding parts could damage your gums, make them sore or sensitive, or even lacerate the soft tissues. And even if these problems don’t become apparent immediately, they may lead to worse troubles over time. Dentures that don’t fit properly can cause you to become more susceptible to oral infections, such as cheilitis and stomatitis. They may also lead to nutritional problems, since you’re likely to have difficulty eating anything but soft, processed foods.

Finally, the kits themselves just don’t offer the same quality products you’d find in a professional lab. That means whatever repairs you’re able to make aren’t likely to last very long. Plus, they contain all sorts of substances that not only smell nasty, but can quickly bond your fingers to the kitchen counter — or to the broken dentures. (Imagine trying to explain that at the emergency room…)

So do yourself a favor: If your dentures need repair, don’t try and do it yourself. Bring them in to our office — it’s the best thing for your dentures… and your health.

If you would like more information about dentures or denture repair, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Loose Dentures” and “Removable Full Dentures.”




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